Jan 3, 2017

Lawsuit On Student Loan Collection Practices

     From Market Watch:
For about a year, Hector Rodriguez lost a portion of his limited income, including in some months, a portion of his much-needed Social Security disability benefits over a student loan that was eligible for forgiveness.
Rodriguez, an army veteran, took out student loans in the 1970s to attend college, but he ultimately had to drop out due to frequent hospitalizations and later defaulted on the debt, according to a lawsuit he filed against multiple government agencies earlier this month. In 1973, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia. He began receiving Social Security disability benefits shortly thereafter and has received them continuously ever since.
Rodriguez’s disability was so severe that he qualified to have his student loans wiped away through what’s known as a total and permanent disability discharge (TPD). And yet, in 2013, he received a notice from the government indicating that the feds planned to garnish a portion of his disability benefits to pay off his student loan, according to his lawsuit. The notice never indicated that a disability discharge might be a possibility and when he spoke to the government-hired debt collector responsible for his loan he or she never provided that information even though he informed them that he was disabled, he claims.
Shortly thereafter, the government began taking $177 out of his $1,184 disability check. ...
But the Department of Education is working to make it easier for borrowers who qualify for a disability discharge to receive it. Earlier this year, the agency cross-referenced its records with those of the Social Security administration and identified nearly 400,000 borrowers who qualified for a discharge — about 100,000 of which were at risk of losing their tax refunds or Social Security benefits over the debt — and sent them a letter inviting them to apply for one. The agency also began suspending disability benefit offsets in cases where it’s clear the borrower has a medical condition that won't improve, according to the recent GAO report....

3 comments:

Gayle Myrna said...



Re: Madonado comment: SCAM!

AKM said...

I did mention this before, bu the IBR (Income Based Repayment) Program will take your taxable income and calculate your minimum payment, which is usually reasonable (depending on your situation, of course). Most SS income is nontaxable, and therefore most people would have a calculated monthly payment amount of ZERO. It is just a form to fill out each year.

Anonymous said...

That voodoo you do!